Dem senators call for independent Flynn probe

Dem senators call for independent Flynn probe
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Nearly a dozen Democratic senators are calling for an independent special counsel to investigate communications between President Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn and Russia.

The 11 senators sent a letter Tuesday to Attorney General Jeff SessionsJeff SessionsSessions to keep up fight on sanctuary cities despite legal setback Suspended Alabama judge running for Senate Trump and Sessions peddle fear instead of solutions to crime MORE saying that "an independent investigation is now necessary to determine what General Flynn did, who knew about it and when."

“We are deeply concerned about credible allegations that the Trump campaign, transition team, and Administration has colluded with the Russian government, including most recently the events leading to the resignation of Lieutenant General Michael Flynn as National Security Adviser,” they wrote in the letter released Wednesday.

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“To maintain the confidence, credibility and impartiality of the Department of Justice, we urge you to immediately appoint an independent Special Counsel to investigate collusion with the Russian government by General Flynn and other Trump campaign, transition and Administrative officials.”

Wednesday’s letter was signed by Democratic Sens. Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalFCC head unveils plan to roll back net neutrality Senate votes to confirm Rosenstein as deputy attorney general Hoyer not insisting on ObamaCare subsidies in spending bill MORE (Conn.), Tom UdallTom UdallOvernight Energy: Trump orders review of national monuments, claiming ‘egregious abuse’ Dem vows to fight Trump 'every step of the way' on national monuments Senate Dems want Trump to release ethics waivers, visitor logs MORE (N.M.), Tammy BaldwinTammy BaldwinLawmakers targeted as district politics shift Senate approves Trump's Agriculture chief Lawmakers talk climate for Earth Day, Science March MORE (Wis.), Tom CarperTom CarperDems probe claims of religious bias in DHS 'trusted traveler' program Senate Dems want Trump to release ethics waivers, visitor logs Medicare’s coverage decisions need more input from physicians MORE (Del.), Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyOvernight Cybersecurity: Ex-officials warn 'Buy American' might harm Pentagon cybersecurity | Chair nudges Trump on cyber order | House gets security training Overnight Tech: FCC chief unveils plan for net neutrality rollback | Tech on Trump's sweeping tax plan | Cruz looks to boost space industry FCC head unveils plan to roll back net neutrality MORE (Mass.), Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyOvernight Energy: Trump orders review of national monuments, claiming ‘egregious abuse’ Overnight Regulation: Lawmakers look to delay labor board ruling Senate Dems offer bill to restore internet privacy rules MORE (Ore.), Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownDems crowd primaries to challenge GOP reps Battle begins over Wall Street rules Congress nears deal on help for miners MORE (Ohio), Dick DurbinDick DurbinLawmakers push one-week stopgap funding bill Rob Thomas: Anti-Trump celebs have become 'white noise' Overnight Energy: Lawmakers work toward deal on miners’ benefits MORE (Ill.), Chris Van Hollen (Md.), Cory Booker (N.J.) and Patrick LeahyPatrick LeahyLawmakers talk climate for Earth Day, Science March Poll: Sanders most popular senator in the US Senate Dems offer bill to restore internet privacy rules MORE (Vt.).

The group added that “absent swift action by a Special Counsel, evidence of this troubling conduct will be a high risk of concealment.”

“At stake is the integrity and honesty of our most trusted public officials and the viability of our justice system,” they wrote.

Flynn resigned late Monday amid reports he misled senior White House officials about a series of phone calls with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak in December.

The retired Army lieutenant general said in a letter on his resignation Monday that he “inadvertently” gave “incomplete information” to Vice President Pence and others about his discussions with Kislyak.

Flynn's resignation followed reports last week that, despite denials, he and the Russian envoy spoke about U.S. sanctions against Russia before Trump’s Jan. 20 inauguration.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Tuesday that Trump asked for Flynn’s resignation once the president’s trust in his adviser "eroded."

Reports emerged later Tuesday that several aides and allies to Trump’s 2016 bid repeatedly conversed with senior Russian intelligence officials, according to intercepted phone calls and phone records.

Current and former U.S. officials told The New York Times they had seen no evidence of collusion in regards to hacking or the 2016 race, or if the talks centered on Trump himself.