Dem senators call for independent Flynn probe

Dem senators call for independent Flynn probe
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Nearly a dozen Democratic senators are calling for an independent special counsel to investigate communications between President Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn and Russia.

The 11 senators sent a letter Tuesday to Attorney General Jeff SessionsJeff SessionsPerez: Trump ‘trying to bully law enforcement’ over sanctuary cities Sessions says grants to be withheld from sanctuary cities Cheech Marin hopes Trump voters 'starting to realize their mistake' MORE saying that "an independent investigation is now necessary to determine what General Flynn did, who knew about it and when."

“We are deeply concerned about credible allegations that the Trump campaign, transition team, and Administration has colluded with the Russian government, including most recently the events leading to the resignation of Lieutenant General Michael Flynn as National Security Adviser,” they wrote in the letter released Wednesday.

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“To maintain the confidence, credibility and impartiality of the Department of Justice, we urge you to immediately appoint an independent Special Counsel to investigate collusion with the Russian government by General Flynn and other Trump campaign, transition and Administrative officials.”

Wednesday’s letter was signed by Democratic Sens. Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalSenators introduce new Iran sanctions Senators demand Pentagon action after nude photo scandal Gorsuch rewrites playbook for confirmation hearings MORE (Conn.), Tom UdallTom UdallThe Hill's 12:30 Report Dems introduce MAR-A-LAGO Act to publish visitor logs The Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee MORE (N.M.), Tammy BaldwinTammy BaldwinPath to 60 narrows for Trump pick Overnight Finance: Senators spar over Wall Street at SEC pick's hearing | New CBO score for ObamaCare bill | Agency signs off on Trump DC hotel lease The Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee MORE (Wis.), Tom CarperTom CarperPath to 60 narrows for Trump pick Overnight Finance: Trump stock slump | GOP looks to tax bill for lifeline | Trump repeals 'blacklisting rule' | Dem wants ethics probe into Treasury secretary The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (Del.), Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyThe Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Overnight Regulation: Senate moves to strike Obama-era internet privacy rules Overnight Tech: Senate votes to eliminate Obama internet privacy rules | FCC chief wants to stay out of 'political debate' on fake news | Wikileaks reveals new CIA docs MORE (Mass.), Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyThe Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Dem senator accuses Trump of 'dangerous tilt towards authoritarianism' Overnight Regulation: Dems punch back in fight over CEO pay rule MORE (Ore.), Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownPath to 60 narrows for Trump pick Overnight Finance: Trump stock slump | GOP looks to tax bill for lifeline | Trump repeals 'blacklisting rule' | Dem wants ethics probe into Treasury secretary Dems question potential Kushner real estate deal with Chinese firm MORE (Ohio), Dick DurbinDick DurbinThe Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Gorsuch rewrites playbook for confirmation hearings Gorsuch: I'm 'sorry' for ruling against autistic student MORE (Ill.), Chris Van Hollen (Md.), Cory Booker (N.J.) and Patrick LeahyPatrick LeahyPath to 60 narrows for Trump pick Overnight Regulation: Trump repeals 'blacklisting' rule Senators call for pay equity for US women's hockey team MORE (Vt.).

The group added that “absent swift action by a Special Counsel, evidence of this troubling conduct will be a high risk of concealment.”

“At stake is the integrity and honesty of our most trusted public officials and the viability of our justice system,” they wrote.

Flynn resigned late Monday amid reports he misled senior White House officials about a series of phone calls with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak in December.

The retired Army lieutenant general said in a letter on his resignation Monday that he “inadvertently” gave “incomplete information” to Vice President Pence and others about his discussions with Kislyak.

Flynn's resignation followed reports last week that, despite denials, he and the Russian envoy spoke about U.S. sanctions against Russia before Trump’s Jan. 20 inauguration.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Tuesday that Trump asked for Flynn’s resignation once the president’s trust in his adviser "eroded."

Reports emerged later Tuesday that several aides and allies to Trump’s 2016 bid repeatedly conversed with senior Russian intelligence officials, according to intercepted phone calls and phone records.

Current and former U.S. officials told The New York Times they had seen no evidence of collusion in regards to hacking or the 2016 race, or if the talks centered on Trump himself.