Lawmakers vow to move ahead with Russia probes

Lawmakers vow to move ahead with Russia probes
© Greg Nash

Congress is plowing forward with its various investigations into Russian interference in the election and links to President Trump’s campaign even as a special counsel begins to run the federal probe.

Lawmakers attending closed-door briefings with deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein, said they are determined to move ahead with their own efforts after the naming of former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special prosecutor.

A special counsel has the broad authority to conduct a sweeping probe largely unaccountable to Congress, raising fears that Mueller could limit what documents congressional investigators receive or who can appear before their committees.

But leaders of the House Intelligence Committee’s probe on Friday brushed aside concerns their investigation could be complicated by Mueller’s probe.

ADVERTISEMENT
“I don’t see any impediments to anything that we would like to do as a result of Mueller coming in to take over an investigation that was already going on in the Justice Department,” said Rep. Mike Conaway (R-Texas), who is leading the Intel panel’s probe following the recusal of chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.).

Lawmakers typically “deconflict” committee investigations with any concurrent Justice probes to avoid trampling on prosecutorial turf — by providing congressional immunity to someone Justice may later wish to pursue, for example.

“We were always going to have to set up some sort of deconfliction process with Justice,” Conaway said.

House Intelligence Committee ranking member Adam SchiffAdam SchiffWhite House refers House panel to Trump's tweets about Comey 'tapes' Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump tweetstorm on Russia probe | White House reportedly pushing to weaken sanctions bill | Podesta to testify before House Intel House Intel Dem says Trump's tweet about 'tapes' not enough MORE (D-Calif.) said there was already a need to coordinate with Justice prior to Mueller's appointment.

“Now we’ll have those conversations with Bob Mueller, instead of others at the Justice Department,” Schiff said Friday.  

Sens. Richard BurrRichard BurrSenate intel panel to hold hearing on Russian meddling in Europe Overnight Tech: Uber CEO resigns | Trump's Iowa tech trip | Dems push Sessions to block AT&T-Time Warner deal | Lawmakers warned on threat to election systems | Overnight Cybersecurity: Obama DHS chief defends Russian hack response | Trump huddles on grid security | Lawmakers warned about cyber threat to election systems MORE (R-N.C.) and Mark WarnerMark WarnerPolicymakers forget duty to protect taxpayers from financial failures Donna Brazile: Congress has duty to halt Trump on Russia sanctions Lawmakers told of growing cyber threat to election systems MORE (D-Va.), the chairman and vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, have also said that their investigation will continue in the wake of Mueller’s announcement.

Warner said Thursday that he and Burr are working to sit down with Mueller as soon as next week to coordinate the jurisdictional boundaries of their investigations.

In two back-to-back briefings with the Senate and the House this week, Rosenstein reportedly provided assurances that the various investigations could operate in harmony with special counsel Bob Mueller’s probe.

Rosenstein on Thursday revealed to lawmakers that the FBI’s probe is no longer strictly a counterintelligence investigation — a kind of probe that does not normally result in charges — but also a criminal one.

That distinction, more than the appointment of Mueller, could draw jurisdictional lines around certain witnesses, outside experts with experience in congressional investigations say.

The two intelligence committees are probably the least likely to be impacted by the criminal nature of the FBI’s probe — because their broader focus is how Russia was able to interfere in the U.S. election, not solely whether Trump campaign officials coordinated with Moscow.

“In many ways our purview is broader than what may be some of the Justice Department/FBI investigation," Warner told reporters Thursday.

Two other committees are also investigating issues related to Russia’s interference in the election, the House Oversight Committee and a subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee led by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamSenate panel questions Lynch on alleged FBI interference The Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Judiciary Committee to continue Russia probe after Mueller meeting MORE (R-S.C.) and Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseSenate panel questions Lynch on alleged FBI interference Judiciary Committee to continue Russia probe after Mueller meeting GOP hits the gas on ObamaCare repeal MORE (D-R.I.).

Oversight is probing whether there has been any political interference from the White House into the FBI’s probe. Chairman Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzGowdy won't use Oversight gavel to probe Russia The Hill's 12:30 Report Chaffetz: Trump administration 'almost worse' than Obama's on transparency MORE (R-Utah) is pushing to have former FBI Director James Comey testify on his controversial dismissal, a decision that President Trump has publicly linked to the FBI’s investigation.

Rosenstein gave Mueller control of not only the investigation into whether Trump campaign associates coordinated with Russia but also any other matters that “may arise directly from the investigation” — like Comey’s dismissal.

The potentially overlapping scope of those two probes has raised speculation that Comey may not be able to appear before Congress, despite a chorus of requests from committees in both the House and Senate.

The Senate Intelligence Committee and the full Judiciary Committee have also requested Comey’s appearance.

Rep. Will Hurd (R-Texas) said Thursday on CNN that he is “pretty confident” Comey will appear before the Oversight Committee, possibly as soon as next week.

Graham, whose subcommittee is focused on Russia’s methodology, has expressed the most explicit concern that his investigation will be limited by the developments in the federal probe.

“I think it pretty well at a minimum limits it, maybe just takes us out of the game,” he said Thursday. “It’s going to be hard for us. … Public access to what happened is going to be very limited now because of a special counsel and I don’t want to get in his way.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellTrump called Cruz to press him on ObamaCare repeal bill: report Meadows: Senate bill lacks conservative support to pass House Fifth GOP senator announces opposition to healthcare bill MORE (R-Ky.) has repeatedly argued that the appropriate place for any investigation into Russian interference is in the Intelligence Committees.

Leadership in both chambers has insisted that the investigations will go forward independent of Mueller’s appointment.

McConnell said the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation will proceed in a statement given immediately following Mueller’s appointment.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul RyanRyan reminds lawmakers to be on time for votes Lawmakers consider new security funding in wake of shooting Paul Ryan: ‘Beautiful day’ to catch up with Bono MORE (R-Wis.) has also said repeatedly that Mueller’s appointment in no way eliminates the need for Congress to continue its examination into the Russia question.

“These bipartisan, bicameral investigations — House Intelligence Committee, Senate Intelligence Committee — are going to continue their investigations,” Ryan said during a press briefing in the Capitol. “We’re going to keep doing our jobs — keep our Russia investigations going.”