Mexico: Recent deportations 'a violation' of US immigration rules

Mexico: Recent deportations 'a violation' of US immigration rules
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Mexican authorities on Thursday accused U.S. officials of violating their own rules in the cases of a so-called "Dreamer" and a mother of four who were recently deported to Mexico.

"In the frame of respect to U.S. law, the Chancellery highlights that the cases of Mrs. [Maribel] Trujillo and Mr. [Juan Manuel] Montes Bojorquez represent a violation to the express rules of deportation in that country," read a statement released by the Secretariat of Foreign Relations, also known as the Chancellery.

"Neither of the compatriots represented a risk to the security of North American society and neither of them has a criminal background," the statement continued.

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Montes gained notice as the first recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program to be deported. Montes was arrested near the Mexican border by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents in February and deported to Mexico despite his claim of protected status.

DACA recipients, or Dreamers, are protected from deportation unless they commit a crime or leave the country without prior authorization from United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.

CBP claims Montes had left the country without authorization before being arrested, a charge his lawyers deny.

Montes's case has received attention from both sides of the political aisle, with Democrats and some Republicans such as Sen. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsOvernight Finance: GOP divided over welfare cuts in budget | Lawmaker loses M on pharma stock he pitched | Yellen says another financial crisis unlikely in our lifetimes Overnight Tech: EU hits Google with record fine | Amazon gears up for lobbying battle | Facebook hits 2 billion users | New ransomware spreads across globe Overnight Regulation: EPA moves to repeal Obama water rule | Labor chief to review overtime rule | Record fine for Google MORE (Maine) expressing concern over the deportation of a Dreamer.

But some lawmakers celebrated the move.

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) posted a celebratory tweet with a beer that read, "First non-valedictorian DREAMer deported. Border Patrol, this one's for you."

Trujillo is an Ohio mother of four with no criminal record who was deported by Immigration and Customs Enforcement Wednesday.

"The compatriot is the support of her family and since 2002 has worked and contributed to her community in the United States," read the Mexican Foreign Relations statement.

Trujillo received support from both Ohio senators, Rob PortmanRob PortmanOvernight Healthcare: Senate delays ObamaCare vote past recess | Trump says GOP 'very close' to deal | Three more senators come out against bill Three more GOP senators announce opposition to healthcare bill GOP chairman wants 'robust' tax reform process in the Senate MORE (R) and Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownMajor progressive group rolls out first incumbent House endorsement Dems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity Senate Banking panel huddles with regulators on bank relief MORE (D), as well as Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R).

"I'm disappointed that the case could not have been resolved in a manner that keeps this family together," said Portman.

Trujillo chose to leave her U.S.-citizen children in Ohio, and her request to reopen her asylum case is pending.

Mexican authorities pledged to continue consular and legal support for its citizens in the United States, and to strengthen dialogue with their U.S. counterparts "with the end of enforcing the Rule of Law."

Mexico's consular network in the United States is the world's biggest, with 50 consulates scattered around the country.

The network was bolstered with a 1 billion peso (about $50 million) allocation this year, as President Enrique Peña Nieto expanded the consulates' migrant protection powers.