Former Gov. O'Malley tests 2020 waters with poll

Former Gov. O'Malley tests 2020 waters with poll
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A political action committee affiliated with former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley polled Democratic caucus voters in Iowa, suggesting that the failed 2016 presidential contender might be considering trying again in 2020. 

O’Malley’s leadership PAC commissioned a Public Policy Polling survey earlier this month, according a POLITICO report.

Politico reports O’Malley lead the other potential Democratic candidates with 18 percent of the vote. Other candidates included Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), former Housing Secretary Julian Castro, Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.), Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSenate votes to confirm Rosenstein as deputy attorney general Senate approves Trump's Agriculture chief Dems urge Trump to include Northeast Corridor tunnel project in infrastructure bill MORE (D-N.Y.), Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDem labels infrastructure ‘top thing’ Trump can accomplish Wyden pushing to mandate 'basic cybersecurity' for Senate Senators press the FCC on rural broadband affordability MORE (D-Minn.) and well-known business leaders like Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz. 

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While most of the other candidates received less than 10 percent of the vote, Booker followed close behind O’Malley with 17 percent, while Klobuchar received 11 percent. Nearly a third of the polled Iowans voted “not sure.”

The poll didn't include other high-profile potential Democratic hopefuls, including Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenObama's speech proves hypocrisy of Democrat's anti-Wall Street rhetoric Warren to Trump: The Constitution applies to you, too GOP senator: Trump is 'moving at business pace, not government pace' MORE (D-Mass.), Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownDems crowd primaries to challenge GOP reps Battle begins over Wall Street rules Congress nears deal on help for miners MORE (D-Ohio) and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders on skipping WH Korea briefing: 'I did not want to be part of a photo op' Demanding transparency and fairness from Trump tax plan Overnight Energy: Trump orders review of national monuments, claiming ‘egregious abuse’ MORE (I-Vt.)

Presidential hopefuls often focus on Iowa because, as the first contest in the Democratic primary, it can provide momentum for candidates in a crowded field.

O’Malley ran for the Democratic nomination in 2016, but he dropped out of the race after receiving little support in a race that became defined by the fight between Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonObama's speech proves hypocrisy of Democrat's anti-Wall Street rhetoric Lawmakers targeted as district politics shift Want a tremendous deal on infrastructure spending? Suspend Davis-Bacon MORE and Sanders.

Dave Hamrick, O’Malley’s 2016 campaign manager, suggested that the poll would test whether the candidate had garnered support in Iowa during the 2016 election.

“Governor O’Malley spent a lot of time in Iowa during the campaign and made a very favorable impression on Iowa Democrats. We wanted to see if the conversations he started with Iowans resonated and are glad to learn that they did,” Hamrick said.