Poll: Dems favor Biden, Sanders for 2020 nomination

Poll: Dems favor Biden, Sanders for 2020 nomination
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Joe BidenJoe BidenAmazon primed for merger battle Delaware pool where Biden worked as lifeguard named after him The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE and Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders: FBI inquiry of wife is 'pathetic' attack Why UK millennials voting for socialism could happen here, too WATCH LIVE: Senate Dems hold ‘People’s Filibuster’ against ObamaCare repeal MORE lead the field of potential Democratic presidential nominees in 2020, a Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey released Tuesday shows. 

When Democratic voters are asked to pick from a field of nine Democratic candidates, 31 percent pick the vice president and 24 percent favor the Vermont senator to be the Democratic nominee.

On the other hand, the PPP survey also found that Democratic voters want a younger candidate who hasn't run for president before. Sanders and Biden are both in their 70s and have run for the White House before. 

Another 16 percent of poll respondents said they would vote for Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren goes on tweetstorm over GOP ObamaCare repeal bill Warren: Dems should campaign on single-payer healthcare plan Senate Dems step up protests ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote MORE (D-Mass.) if she ran, while 14 percent were undecided. 

Other candidates mentioned have low support.

Only 4 percent of those surveyed said they would vote for New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, while 2 percent each said they would pick Ohio Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownMajor progressive group rolls out first incumbent House endorsement Dems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity Senate Banking panel huddles with regulators on bank relief MORE, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro. 

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Meanwhile, Minnesota Sen. Al FrankenAl FrankenOvernight Energy: EPA moves to repeal Obama water rule GOP senator calls for tight scrutiny on AT&T's proposed Time Warner merger Howard Stern: I have a 'man crush' on Al Franken MORE and New York Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSenate Democrats: ObamaCare repeal fight isn't over yet Bipartisan senators seek to boost expertise in military justice system Mattis gaining power in Trump’s Cabinet MORE received 3 percent support each for the nomination.

With the 2020 election nearly four years away, early polls generally only show which candidates have the strongest name recognition, which would explain while Biden, Sanders and Warren are emerging as top picks for Democratic voters. 

PPP notes that Booker, Cuomo, Castro, Brown and Gillibrand all have less than 50 percent name recognition with Democrats nationally. 

In 2012, polls gave Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioSenators urge Trump to do right thing with arms sales to Taiwan Why liberals should support Trump — not Obama — on Cuba policy The Memo: Trump seeks to put his stamp on nation MORE (R-Fla.) and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) large advantages, though they both ended their presidential bids early in the year. 

However, polls also showed Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonBrooks’s prior attacks on Trump could hurt in Alabama Senate race Pro-Trump group pulls ads targeting GOP senator on ObamaCare repeal Stone to testify before House Intel Committee next month MORE dominating the field of prospective Democratic candidates, which she won despite a strong challenge from Sanders. 

Fifty-seven percent of Democrats polled said they want their candidate to be under the age of 60, and 77 percent said they want their candidate to be younger than 70. 

Biden and Sanders are 74 and 75, respectively. 

Only 25 percent of Democrats said they want their candidate to be someone who has run for president before, while 41 prefer someone who hasn't, and 34 percent said they are not sure one way or the other. 

“There’s a tension for Democrats nationally,” said Dean Debnam, president of Public Policy Polling. “They want new blood, but their most well known and popular figures don’t exactly fit that mold. Of course they have a long time to get that all figured out.” 

The poll surveyed 400 Democratic primary voters on Dec. 6 and 7, and has a margin of error of 4.9 percentage points.